Atmospheric Emissions

Our atmosphere is unmistakably that of a post-industrial civilization. High levels of carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and chlorofluorocarbons are the result of hundreds of years of manufacturing emmissions, as is the depletion of the ozone layer as a consequence of the release into the atmosphere of halocarbons and other manufactured chemicals. Other technological civilizations which exist on the surfaces of exoplanets are likely to have a comparable impact on their atmospheres.

Detectability

  • Air pollution, and specifically the toxic emissions of manufacturing processes, would be an indicator of technological activity, and could be detected by the analysis of a planet's atmosphere as it transits its sun.

Research

15-Jul-2021
4-Mar-2021
2-Mar-2021
9-Feb-2021
The Astrophysical Journal
23-Oct-2020
International Journal of Astrobiology
14-Mar-2019
20-Dec-2018
29-Dec-2017
30-Jul-2015
International Journal of Astrobiology
26-Dec-2011
Acta Astronautica
(15-Jul-2021)
Amedeo Balbi and Milan M. Cirkovic (4-Mar-2021)
Hector Socas-Navarro, Jacob Haqq-Misra, Jason T. Wright et al. (2-Mar-2021)
Ravi Kopparapu, Giada Arney, Jacob Haqq-Misra et al. (9-Feb-2021)
The Astrophysical Journal
David Kipping, Adam Frank, Caleb Scharf (23-Oct-2020)
International Journal of Astrobiology
Jacob Haqq-Misra, Anamaria Berea, Amedeo Balbi et al. (14-Mar-2019)
NASA Technosignatures Workshop Participants (20-Dec-2018)
Jacob Haqq-Misra, Sanjoy Som, Brendan Mullan et al. (29-Dec-2017)
Adam Stevens, Duncan Forgan and Jack O'Malley-James (30-Jul-2015)
International Journal of Astrobiology
Richard A. Carrigan Jr. (26-Dec-2011)
Acta Astronautica