Artificial Satellites

Earth's first artificial satellite, Sputnik I, orbited the Earth in 1957, and over the past half century nearly 10,000 additional satellites have been launched, roughly half of which remain in orbit today. A technologically advanced civilization will presumably be similarly inclined to deploy technology into orbit for scientific or commercial gain, and over time, the number, size and utility of artificial satellites may increase on par.

Detectability

  • Natural satellites are potentially detectable when transiting a planet by the dimming of the parent planet's light curve.
  • Similarly, a sufficiently large number of artificial satellites could also be detectable by their influence on the light of their parent planet, although differentiating between natural and artificial satellites would represent an extreme challenge of resolution for any telescope.

Research

15-Jul-2021
2-Mar-2021
22-Sep-2019
10-Jul-2019
Research Notes of the AAS
20-Dec-2018
1-Oct-2018
21-Feb-2018
27-May-2015
Astrophysical Journal
(15-Jul-2021)
Hector Socas-Navarro, Jacob Haqq-Misra, Jason T. Wright et al. (2-Mar-2021)
(22-Sep-2019)
David Kipping (10-Jul-2019)
Research Notes of the AAS
NASA Technosignatures Workshop Participants (20-Dec-2018)
S. V. Berdyugina, J. R. Kuhn, M. Langlois et al. (1-Oct-2018)
Hector Socas-Navarro (21-Feb-2018)
Eric J. Korpela , Shauna M. Sallmen , and Diana Leystra Greene University of California et al. (27-May-2015)
Astrophysical Journal